Buckman's Big Board - OMFL.com blog

Discussion in 'Thread Archive' started by Winuvas, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    Buckman's Big Board - OMFL.com blog

    Buckman's Big Board: Part One

    by Antoine Buckman
    Blogger, OMFL.com

    Well, now, OMFL.com has some cash in the coffers to hire TWO bloggers. While my colleague, Adam Chiefsman, talks about what is going on in the league, I get to talk about my passion - college ranks.

    I LOVE college football. Especially the guys that are coming into the OMFL. So each week I'll give a breakdown of what is going on at each position in the college ranks. Call it a breakdown of players, an analysis of talent.

    But first, you gotta know who the top ten guys on my board are. So this first part is a breakdown of how I see the top ten players coming out in this year's draft:

    1. Aspha Savage, SS, Florida: This guy is a bit small at 5'10", 210 pounds. But man, can he HIT. He's been terrorizing opposing SEC offenses for weeks now, and he's amassed 56 tackles through 6 games, including big games against Georgia and LSU. The guy covers like a cornerback as well from his strong safety spot; he's got 6 interceptions. He's also forced 6 fumbles. He's got a lot of speed and loves to make contact. You need a guy to put 8 in the box against a running attack? This kid is YOUR guy. You need a guy that can cover a tight end or slot receiver? This kid is YOUR guy.

    2. K.C. Williams, DE, Florida: You wonder why Florida is #1 in the nation right now in the latest polls? You can see a pattern forming here. Williams, at 6'2", 241 pounds, has been a force on the Gator's defensive line - when he's been healthy. He's been nicked up with an ankle and some arm issues, but when he's in there, he's a force. He's played 4 of the 6 games this season for Florida and already has 10 sacks. You heard me. TEN sacks. FOUR games. He's got excellent technique for a finesse edge rusher. He lacks the bull rush strength, but if you want some sweet finesse, he's the man - IF he can stay on the field.

    3. Shaynon Douglas, DE, Alabama: Three top players all from the SEC. Who says the Big Ten and Pac 10 are power conferences? I'll save that discussion for another time...Douglas is not the fastest player out there at 6'4", 267, but he's probably the most balanced end rusher in the draft. He's got the power to plow through an offensive tackle, the finesse to swim through that same tackle, or if a team doubles up on him, he has the technique to leverage out of it and make plays. Alabama plays a 3-4 defense, which is he a little small for, but don't tell that to Douglas - he still has managed to make 34 tackles through 5 games of the season and provides stout run support. Douglas also has 4 sacks, which coming from a 3-4 defensive end is an accomplishment. He's been timed in the 40 at about 5.1, so speed is not his strong point.

    4. Storm Williams, DT, Texas Tech: Just getting in at 6'0", 294 pounds, this guy is a force in the Big 12. In 5 games so far, Williams has amassed 47 tackles, 6 sacks, and 2 forced fumbles against the likes of Kansas, Texas, and Missouri, among others. He's not a speed, finesse defensive tackle either - no sir. This guy is one of the strongest guys I've ever met. He bench presses regularly - not max, but regularly - 275 pounds at 50 reps. Guys, that is CRAZY strong. While not flashy with finesse moves like swim moves for rushing the quarterback, he just flat out runs people over with his strength and non-stop motor. If he gets his hands on you, you're not getting away. Period. If you need a 4-3 tackle who can man the point of attack and take away a running lane from an opposing back, this guy is YOUR guy.

    5. Tre Williams, DE, Wisconsin: The first Big Ten player off my big board comes on the defensive side as well. Williams, 6'5" and 264 pounds, is not as flashy as his counterparts in Florida or Alabama. He's as fast as K.C. Williams from Florida, and he's a better pass rusher than Williams is as well. He's got good power technique even without a whole lot of upper body strength. His weakness from film I've seen is that he tends to disappear at times, especially when there is a tight end on his side of the field. Through 4 games so far this season, he's amassed 8 sacks. However, those came in his first three games. His last game versus Michigan he was shut off the stat line due to Michigan leaving a tight end to chip on his side. He needs to work on getting off of blocks quicker to make a big impact sack-wise, but his overall athleticism cannot be argued.

    6. Dorian Hill, FS, North Colorado: Okay, so this kid plays in the Big Sky Conference. It's in the FCS series (formerly known as 1-AA). So you're thinking: no way can this kid be a top ten pick. Right? WRONG. First off, Hill is solid size-wise for the OMFL at 6'0", 210 pounds. Hill has been clocked, unofficially, at 4.41 speed in the 40 yard dash. He plays both strong and free safety for North Colorado, interchanging as down and distance change. He can hit like a strong safety, himself responsible for 75 tackles in 6 games. That isn't a joke. 75 tackles in 6 games. I had to say it twice. He's forced EIGHT fumbles in that time. Oh, yeah, he's also got 7 interceptions when he plays centerfield at free safety in North Colorado's scheme. This kid has all the tools - he just needs to prove it on the big time stage of the OMFL. And I know he will.

    7. Jamarcus Austin, QB, Auburn: The first offensive player on the top ten big board comes in at the seven spot. Austin, 6'2" and 222 pounds, has the tools to be successful: he's fast, can run over cornerbacks and some linebackers, and has a powerful arm. But...there are some questions about his accuracy. This season, through 5 games, he's completed around 62% of his passes. That's good. But further analysis shows that he's about 40% in the line of scrimmage to 10 yard range, where most slants, drags, and other routes would be thrown in the pros. That's terrible. Austin throws a tremendously accurate deep ball though - 14 of his 17 touchdowns this season have been thrown at least 30 yards in the air before a receiver caught it. He's a franchise quarterback to the right team, for sure. Just don't expect him his first year to be a dink and dunk quarterback.

    8. Aukeem Tigner, T, Tennessee-Martin: Another small town kid making a name for a pro contract. Tigner, 6'7" and 290 pounds, has a small frame for a left tackle spot (which is where he plays in college), but he's a strong guy who uses leverage and proper technique. In the OMFL, he will need to work on his run blocking footwork, as Tennessee-Martin uses a lot of spread option pass attack and not a lot of power running. However, his pass blocking technique is superb for a young guy coming out of college. As a guy protecting the blind side of most quarterbacks, he'll be quality for many years as a left tackle, especially if he gets to a team with a good offensive line coach that can work on his run blocking footwork. The strength and ability is there.

    9. Stehle Jones, G, Notre Dame: Jones, a 6'3", 302 pound guard from Notre Dame, is a solid pick for a guard position in the OMFL. He possesses a quick first step, which is very helpful on pull plays and counters. He also is a beast of a guy in the weight room, and is one of the strongest guys in Notre Dame's history as far as the football program is concerned. He will need some polish though, as his overall technique and leverage skills aren't quite there yet versus other guards coming out, and his pass blocking footwork in particular needs attention. He also needs to work on his overall "mean streak", as I never see him obliterate guys he's blocking. However, with his strength and desire to succeed, this guy will be a force in a year or two after some quality tutelage under a good line coach.

    10. Benji Tuiloma, C, Stanford: You know Tuiloma, 6'2" and 315 pounds, is an intelligent man. Stanford don't allow dummies to go there. Tuiloma is a monster on the field. When he blocks someone, they stay down. He's not fast, but he is extremely quick the first two-three steps after the ball is snapped. Stanford utilizes him well in their zone blocking, counter happy offensive setup, where they utilize that quick step to their advantage. However, his overall technique, like Stehle Jones from Notre Dame, needs work. While dominant when he gets in contact with someone, he doesn't always apply proper leverage and technique, which can be worked on in the pros. Tuiloma also gets away with some footwork issues in the passing game, but overall I like the guy's attitude on the field. I would take him and get him ready to start the following year, or just throw him out there and let his instincts take him where he wants to go.

    There you have it. My top 10 prospects regardless of position. Next time I'll go over the position of glamor: the quarterbacks. I'll do a breakdown of what they are good at and what they are bad at and where I see them going overall. For those that are interested in seeing my analysis of players now (and don't care what I have to say about them), here is a link to "Buckman's Big Board".

    https://spreadsheets.google.com/ccc...ESndXR2tibF9wbnc&authkey=CJ-q8dAC&hl=en#gid=8

    Hope you enjoy the work, guys.

    Keep up with all your draft/OMFL.com coverage on the sister website:
    www.traditionfootball.com
     
  2. wajomatik

    wajomatik Magister De Puer De Vacca

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    I love it
     
  3. CALi BUCC

    CALi BUCC Walk On

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    mail man delivering again, good work!
     
  4. Emmdotfrisk

    Emmdotfrisk Working half days on my days off.

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    Jonathan Joeckel from IOWA will be mine...
     
  5. weblink21

    weblink21 Walk On

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    No WR Aaron Scott on the list? 82 ovr with 94 speed. You and Nate trying to keep him for yourself? :p Great write up!
     
  6. NDCOLTS1979

    NDCOLTS1979 I love you red solo cup

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    (n)
     
  7. Emmdotfrisk

    Emmdotfrisk Working half days on my days off.

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    [​IMG]

    (n)(n)(n)(n)
     
  8. klaximilian

    klaximilian Walk On

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    Made my Big Board already. Sweet work WIN.
     
  9. StevenRhysCann

    StevenRhysCann Arizona Cardinals

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    Great stuff Win, although i hope i win too many games to be able to draft one of these guys.
     
  10. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    Buckman's Big Board: Part Two

    by Antoine Buckman
    Blogger, OMFL.com

    Well, here it comes: the breakdown of the quarterbacks. The glamor positions of the OMFL. The pretty boys that show up in front of all the cameras and either become heroes or goats in front of our eyes. Here is the entire list of quarterbacks that are definitely coming out this year, and where they grade out on my big board. Also, I will list where I think they will be drafted.

    Jamarcus Austin, 6'2", 222, Auburn (#1 QB, #7 overall) : Austin is the number one quarterback coming out this year, bar none. As I said in my top ten discussion, Austin is a big play quarterback who can be a dual threat with his legs as well as his big arm. He throws well on the run, and has great technique with his play action fakes (when he's asked to do that). However, his short throwing accuracy is a concern as he has now only completed 42% of his passes under 10 yards through 7 games. With an overall completion percentage of 57% in the Auburn spread option offense, he can hit the deep ball better than any quarterback that has come out in the last 15 years. I say this guy goes later in the first round because of that short throwing accuracy issues, in the 13-17 range.

    Chris Robinson, 6'3", 237, Nicholls State (#2 QB, #44 overall): While Jamarcus Austin is rated higher because of his athletic ability and his work in a power conference in the SEC, but I think this guy will be the better pro quarterback IF he gets into a good system. Playing at at FCS school doesn't help his draft stock as he plays against sub-par competition, but Robinson has done what he needs to: He's completed over 65% of his passes for over 2400 yards and 17 touchdowns to go with only 5 interceptions. He is big in the pocket but not terribly mobile. He doesn't have Austin's arm, but he can make all the NFL caliber throws well enough to be successful. I feel he's better because his overall accuracy is there at all levels of the field, where it lacks for Austin. I see this guy being a first round choice as well, and going early, in the 10-15 range.

    Brandon Gonzalez, 6'4", 222, North Carolina State (#3 QB, #66 overall): Gonzalez is a guy that could grow into a quality starting quarterback in the league. He has the size to compete at the OMFL level, and he's got a quality arm that can make all the throws you would want. Gonzalez has always been a dink, checkdown type of quarterback though - which is okay if you're a West Coast style offense that keeps throws short. His deep accuracy is nowhere near as polished as Austin or Robinson, completing only 26% of his passes over 30 yards in the air. But with a good quarterback coach, he could develop into a great West Coast style quarterback. Look for him to go early in the second round to a team that needs a quality backup/future starter.

    Bronson Patterson, 6'4", 218, Grand Valley State (#4 QB, #72 overall): Patterson, playing at Division II Grand Valley State, is an enigma. He's got great size, good awareness and pocket presence, and a quality arm. He's very accurate in the short to intermediate range. Looking at his measurables, he's got all that and then some to be a first round pick. However, his intangibles have been questioned since he decided to go to Grand Valley State over some division I schools that made offers. Scouts question his desire to play football at a high level, much less the highest level. The question over his heart and desire drops him to a low second round to early third round selection.

    Dillon Feldt, 6'3", 229, Culver-Stockton (#5 QB, #129 ovr): Feldt is an interesting player as well as Patterson. He has one of the best arms in the draft. His arm has been graded out better than Jamarcus Austin. That's impressive. Feldt's offensive coordinator uses that arm to its best with constant long bomb attempts, and Feldt typically delivers when he's on the field. He has had some issues with concussions and his throwing shoulder. His completion percentage of passes over 30 yards, even with those shoulder issues, is 71%. That is crazy. However, his accuracy of passes below 30 yards.....is 43%. If he can get his accuracy issues in order, he'll be a quality backup. However, scouts seem to think he's reached his potential and won't grow much even at the pro level. I have this guy going in the fifth round to a team needed a good arm that can hit an occasional deep strike.

    Luke Kenny, 6'3", 221, Syracuse (#6 QB, #174 overall): Kenny is a guy that could sneak up on people. What I mean by that is instead of being undrafted, he could get snatched up by a team. Sure, Kenny plays in a BCS conference in the Big East. However, he plays for Syracuse, a team that has not has a quality football team in a decade or more. In their conservative offense that emphasizes short passes and play action, he's been very successful, even with subpar talent. So far he's got 1018 yards with 9 touchdowns and 7 interceptions on a 60% completion percentage. Kenny's play action technique is by far one of the best, if not the best, of the incoming quarterbacks. He hides the ball well on his hip and has a powerful arm to get the throws zipped into receivers in the short range passing game. His powerful arm though is very erratic going deeper than 10-15 yards, and he tends to get into trouble throwing that type of pass. He has some ability to grow into a quality backup quarterback but won't be much more than that with his accuracy problems. Look for him to go in the fourth round.

    Lyndon Shuping, 6'3", 223, Nevada (#7 QB, #188 overall): Shuping comes from Nevada, which utilizes a pistol style offense and focuses on a large amount of passes. This suits Shuping just fine, as he's completed 61% of his passes this year (through 6 games), amassing 2103 yards and 18 touchdowns with 10 interceptions. His biggest detractions coming into the league though: he's not a big guy in the film room, and he makes too many bad reads and poor decisions to be a quality starter in the league. While he has some room to grow a little, most scouts feel his attitude about studying team film is poor and will keep him relegated to a backup or #3 quarterback situation. I see him going very late in the draft, in the late fifth or sixth round to a team well established in that position.

    Charles Vandall, 6'3", 238, Purdue (#8 QB, #217 overall): Vandall has a good OMFL arm, but not superior compared to his peers of this class. He's a quality college player, completing 59% of his passes in the Purdue offense which calls for him to sling it 50-60 times a game. His accuracy across all levels is okay at best, but he tends to miss open receivers a lot more than he should. He's not a workout warrior or film room guru, which would be things that could differentiate him from the rest of the bottom of the quarterback class. As such, if he gets drafted at all, I'd be surprised. Happy for the guy, but surprised nonetheless.

    Michael Thomason, 6'4", 232, Middle Tennessee State (#9 QB, #218 overall): Thomason suffers from the same problems that plague Charles Vandall, the guy right above him on my big board. He's got a good, but not great, arm. He's accurate, but inconsistent. He's got comparable stats to Vandall as well (61% versus 59% completion rate). I rate him lower than Vandall for one simple reason: competition. Thomason has faced Sun Belt competition; Vandall has faced Big Ten competition. I'll give the nod to the guy who faces the better competition. Thomason, in my opinion, won't get drafted either, though.

    Cameron Jones, 6'5", 232, LSU (#10 QB, #219 overall): Jones is a big guy in the pocket. Jones, however, has a very average arm when compared to the rest of the quarterback class, which drops his stock a bit. Also, playing in the big lights of the SEC, he's completed only 56% of his passes for 1411 yards and 11 touchdowns to go with 13 picks. He's a major reason that the current LSU coach is on the hot seat, and with good reason: this guy was touted as a premier recruit four years ago and hasn't produced. He's a marginal OMFL prospect at this point. He'll be sitting in the free agency pool when the draft is over.

    Allen Brown, 6'3", 225, Davidson (#11 QB, #237 overall): Don't get me wrong; Allen Brown has got one of the best arms in the draft from film I've looked at. He's incredibly inconsistent, however, with his accuracy. He forces too many balls into coverage and doesn't let the game come to him at times. He depends way too much on his overall arm and doesn't bother with film study at all. Even his current college coaches have suspended him for games for not showing up to film study. With only a 57% completion percentage at the collegiate ranks (in the Ivy League no less), and no concern with getting better mentally at the game, this guy will only be playing for a team that wants his arm. Period. He's not getting drafted this April for sure.

    Well, that is my analysis of the quarterbacks. Next time I'll look at the deep running back class and give you my good and bad points on each of those guys as well.

    Keep up with all draft/OMFL.com coverage on our sister website:
    www.traditionfootball.com
     
  11. saintsdave75

    saintsdave75 Walk On

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    Nicholls State represent
     
  12. VishaL

    VishaL OMFL Eagles / PMFL Seahawks

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    Great stuff win!
     
  13. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    Thanks. Glad you guys enjoy the articles. I'll keep them coming as time permits.
     
  14. pbates86

    pbates86 Walk On

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    This is awes-mazing.
     
  15. pbates86

    pbates86 Walk On

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    BTW, I see on 1 3-4 DE in this entire class. SMH.
     
  16. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    Buckman's Big Board: Part Three

    by Antoine Buckman
    Blogger, OMFL.com

    Going on with my series to give you analysis on every player coming out in the 2011 OMFL draft, I continue this series with the running back class. This includes fullbacks and halfbacks, and starts now:

    Jake Carver (5'10â€, 208, Penn State, #1 HB, #26 overall): Carver is an athletic specimen at the place known for sending linebackers to the pros. Carver runs very well when he gets to top speed, and he gets to top speed very quickly. He's got great hands out of the backfield for a running back, and he understands how routes are run pretty good for a back coming into the OMFL from a spread option Penn State offense. But Antoine, I hear you asking, what about his stats, man? Well, there are none. He blew out his ACL in the first game of the season, ending his season and his Penn State career. My biggest fears about this kid are his lack of power running ability and his inability to stay on the field. His junior year was marred by knee, ankle, and shoulder injuries. There is also a concern about his hands in the running game – in 305 total carries at Penn State, he's had 18 fumbles. Unacceptable for a kid who can carry the rock with the best of them. My guess is that he'll be drafted high because of his overall athletic ability, in the late first round, but be careful what you get here – could be a special player, or a good way to get a GM fired.

    Brandon Boutte (5'10â€, 222, Nebraska, #2 HB, #27 overall): Boutte came into Nebraska as a highly touted, but undersized, quarterback from the Midwest. Nebraska converted him to a halfback early his sophomore season after a redshirt year, and they never felt bad about that since on both sides. This year, Boutte has run 89 times through 7 games for 854 yards and 8 touchdowns. Boutte also has been a safety valve in the passing game, catching 14 balls for another 175 yards and a touchdown. He even runs the “Wild Husker†formation and can throw out of it fairly effectively. Another good thing to note: He's only fumbled once his entire collegiate career. Once. While his hands and route running are not what Jake Carver's are, Boutte is a more complete back and can dazzle people with his speed and ability to run over people when he has to, although it's not his favorite way to take on tacklers. He's rather dance and dazzle them with his agility. Boutte will go in the top ten in this draft because of his overall speed (fastest running back in the draft at a 4.21, unofficial), athleticism, and ability to play the wildcat formation in the OMFL is only a bonus.

    Jermaine Baker (5'11â€, 209, Kansas, #3 HB, #31 overall): This guy makes Kansas' offense go, go, go. He enjoys contact in Kansas' power running pro-style attack, and it shows. Baker has 108 rushes for almost 900 yards, with 7 touchdowns. He has 608 yards of his 897 after first contact. Baker hunts people down and gets his pads low and initiates contact better than almost anybody in this draft (I would personally say he's behind Rashard House in running after contact), and he has great, but not elite, speed to hit the outside runs like the stretch and toss that are prevalent in the OMFL. The only concern about Baker is his hands – he drops too many balls out of the backfield to be a concern for defenses in the passing game, and he has fumbled 8 times this season, costing Kansas some games. The kid has a lot of potential according to scouts, so look for him to go in the first round, perhaps late in the first round.

    Kenarious Fluellen (5'11â€, 207, Washington, #4 HB, #38 overall): While Baker has been getting most of the attention because he's taken Kansas to a 4-2 start through 6 games, Fluellen has amassed better stats but gone unnoticed. Why? He's playing in Pac-10 land in Washington, and by the time he starts playing, most of the media markets are in bed. Fluellen has rushed for 961 yards on 101 rushes and 9 touchdowns, however, and 705 yards are after first contact. This is also more impressive because teams, knowing Fluellen is the Huskies' only option on offense, are stacking 8, even 9 guys in the box against Fluellen, and he STILL gets his yards. That's special. If you watch film, I'd say Fluellen has a faster overall speed, but Baker has the better first step and acceleration overall. Fluellen can catch a bit out of the backfield as well, getting 8 receptions for 91 yards. He's dropped a few passes on swing routes and such, so teams drafting Fluellen should not look to him to do that exclusively. Like Baker, I think Fluellen will go late in the first round or early in the second round due to his speed and overall ability. Scouts don't see as much potential in him as in Baker, so that drops Fluellen's stock as well.

    Jelan Robinson (5'11â€, 208, Fresno State, #5 HB, #50 overall): Ryan Matthews left Fresno State last year and was drafted in the first round by the San Diego Chargers. Robinson has the same type of skills as Matthews – just less of them. He ran an unofficial 4.32 40-yard dash in spring practices, and he's got speed on the field that can leave people behind. He can run over people, but like Jake Carver, that isn't his primary desire of getting through tacklers. His biggest problem are his hands; while he has run for 812 yards and 6 touchdowns on 97 carries, he's put the rock on the turf 9 times this year and lost 8 of them. He also has had crucial third down drops in the passing game. A good running back coach can help with that, but only so much. His ability will get him drafted early in the second round, but his fumble issues must be corrected before he can become a quality OMFL running back.

    Rashard House (6'0â€, 211, North Carolina, #6 HB, #63 overall): House is another one of my “enigma†type players. While he has run well behind a quality offensive line in North Carolina, he hasn't dominated like he does in practice against his own defense. To be fair, that defense is rated 95th in the country. He doesn't have elite top end speed to get around speedy linebackers, yet he doesn't have supreme strength to bull through defensive linemen consistently. He also has fumble issues, which is not good coming into the OMFL with those aggressive defenses who look to strip the ball out. He is electric in the return game at North Carolina, with a punt and kickoff return for a touchdown, and a 26.1 yards per return on punts and a 31.2 yards per return on kickoffs. Scouts that I have talked to love House's upside and think he can cure his fumble woes and become a bruising style back in the OMFL with his frame and attitude. As a result of his not overly impressive speed, though, he'll be a solid second round pick for a team needing a back of the future while improving special teams now.

    Carey Johnson (6'0â€, 243, West Texas A&M, #1 FB, #67 overall): The first fullback on my big board is tucked away deep in the heart of Texas. The Division II standout was a halfback at WTAMU, but trends toward a fullback/H-back type in the OMFL based on his size/speed ratio. At West Texas, Johnson has run for 1147 yards through 8 games but has trouble with hands, fumbling 12 times and recorded (unofficially) with 8 drops in the passing game. He loves contact as well; with over 900 yards coming after first contact. He needs to work on his run blocking at the professional level and his hands to become an effective fullback/H-back type, but the scouts feel that he has the tools to be a good, if not great, fullback in the OMFL.

    Demarcus Coleman (5'7â€, 191, Mount Union, #7 HB, #75 overall): The diminutive Coleman comes from a diminutive university in Mount Union, a Division III school. He's very fast for the competition he faces. He's got great hands in the passing game, and he does a decent job of holding onto the ball in the running game. Through 6 games, Coleman has over 1000 yards on a 5.3 yards per carry average. He mainly uses his speed to overwhelm Division III opponents, but his speed won't be enough at the OMFL level. Most scouts think he has little potential in the league, but guys like Darren Sproles prove that small guys can get it done at the highest level. I see this guy going late in the second round as a scat back/third down back for a good team.

    Clay Smithey (6'1â€, 248, Maryland, #2 FB, #83 overall): Smithey is, in my opinion, the best fullback/H-back in the draft, but because of the press around the small school Johnson and scouts praising his potential at the next level, Smithey has been lost in the press and therefore has fallen on my big board as an objective analyst. He has quality speed at the H-back spot, and can carry the ball well and catch out of the backfield. He's the best blocker coming out this year at the fullback position, and enjoys roughing up linebackers both carrying the ball and blocking for a running back. In limited carries he's scored 4 touchdowns in Maryland's Power Goalline set, where their tight end lines up at fullback and Smithey lines at tailback. Most scouts feel this guy doesn't have a whole lot of upside, but he's the most polished fullback/H-back coming out. I see this guy going in the second round, maybe mid second round.

    Wesley Dematteo (5'10â€, 228, Ole Miss, #3 FB, #87 overall):
    Dematteo is the smallest of the fullback-specific players in this draft, and is the slowest. While not polished in the run blocking game, this guy has the attitude of a defensive player when he runs into a hole – he wants to punish someone for being in his area. While not a threat to run the ball or catch the ball, scouts feel his run blocking footwork and strength can be worked on at the next level and he'll become a quality player. However, because of his speed and athleticism, I see him going late in the draft if at all, even with his high ranking on this board. Most teams like to have athleticism at all positions, whether for depth or starting purposes. Dematteo, sadly, does not have that skillset. His desire is there, though.

    Andres Byers (5'7â€, 204, UCLA, #8 HB, #88 overall): Typically, most small backs below 5'10†tall are what scouts call “scat backsâ€-guys who are fast and don't like contact and are most successful in space. Byers is what you call an “exceptionâ€. At 204 pounds, this kid enjoys running over people, even with his small frame. He's always been a small guy throughout his high school and collegiate career, and he uses that as motivation to WANT to run people over. Because of that, he's not the fastest guy in the draft by a longshot at the halfback position. But his desire to run over people no matter what gives him the edge he needs. Scouts feel he doesn't have a lot of potential at the next level, but this kid would be a good #2 back behind a quicker starting back. I see him going mid-late third round at best with his skillset.

    Sean Hopkins (5'10â€, 208, Marshall, #9 HB, #89 overall):
    Hopkins is an interesting kid from Marshall. He's got quality stats in the running game, with 121 carries for 765 yards and 6 touchdowns. He also has quality yards after first contact, with 542 of those 765 yards coming after the first hit. However, he has 7 fumbles in costly losses to West Virginia and Miami (OH). While very good at running routes and understanding the passing game concepts that Marshall institutes, Hopkins does not catch the ball well. Of 18 targetted passes, he only caught 7 of them. Hopkins is also a force in the return game, with 2 punt returns for touchdowns already this season. Hopkins is not the fastest guy in the draft, he's fast enough to warrant a look from a team needing a return guy. I see him going late in the second round.

    Patrick Simon (6'0â€, 223, Elon College, #10 HB, #98 overall): Patrick is a big, solid, strong kid out of FCS school Elon University. This guy has the strength to run over folks, but also has the speed to run around people as well. The only concerns are his potential, as scouts think he's reached his full skillset already, his hands, and his work ethic. His hands are suspect, as he has 13 fumbles in 7 games against sub-par competition. As far as work ethic goes, Simon tends to go halfway in practice according to multiple sources. This will not work well in the OMFL. Because of his athetic ability, a team will take him. I see him going in the late third or early fourth round.

    Sam Elliott (6'1â€, 238, Notre Dame, #11 HB, #115 overall): Elliott is like a lot of backs in this draft – he's got good size, athletic, and likes to run over people in the running game. Sadly, like a lot of backs in this draft, he has fumbling issues. While having 746 yards in 6 games is impressive, 8 fumbles don't cut it in the OMFL. Scouts also question his work ethic and potential to grow at the next level. Because of his ability, he'll get drafted in the late third to early fourth round area.

    Quinton Croce (5'11â€, 226, California, #12 HB, #116 overall): Croce is an interesting player coming out of California and the Pac-10. Typically the Pac-10 has speed backs coming from it, but this guy is not a speed back. Typically a slower back is a bruiser type. Croce is not that type of back either. Croce is a classic “tweener†back – not fast enough to be a scat back and not powerful enough to be a bruiser back. This is a problem that, combined with scouts' analysis that he doesn't have much left to grow into, makes a player that won't cut it at the next level. Croce is a good guy, but he won't hear his name at the draft.

    Aaron Bloom (6'0â€, 217, McNeese State, #13 HB, #122 overall):
    Bloom is a quality kid and running back from FCS school McNeese State. He's a good runner in that division, with decent but not blazing speed. At the next level, however, Bloom will be at best a #2 or #3 running back with his skillset. He doesn't do anything poorly, but by the same token he doesn't do anything well either. Bloom has run for 564 yards in 6 games with 4 touchdowns, and has 5 fumbles during that timeframe. His hands are suspect in the passing game. Scouts feel he has a bit of skill to get better at the next level, but nothing like what you would need to be anything better than an average back in the league. He may get drafted, but it will be late in day three. I'd put him going in the sixth to seventh round as depth for a good team.

    Ricardo Maddox (6'1â€, 216, Ball State, #14 HB, #130 overall): Maddox is in a boat similar to Quinton Croce out of Notre Dame. He's not overly fast at the halfback position. With his size and frame, he should be a bruiser back with his speed being what it is (Maddox has been clocked in the 4.7 range unofficially). Through 7 games, Maddox has gotten 671 yards, but only 127 of those have been after first contact. He does have good hands in the receiving game, with 27 catches for 491 yards. For a team who needs a decent receiving threat out of the backfield, Maddox is not bad. Trouble is, there are better options out there. Maddox may go, but he will go very late. I have him going in the seventh round very late.

    Enrique Woods (6'0â€, 208, Dartmouth, #15 HB, #131 overall): The kid from Dartmouth has special speed and athleticism for a guy in the Ivy League. Woods has a 3.91 GPA in Biochemistry. I had to spell check Biochemistry, for crying out loud. While fast and agile, he doesn't possess that elusiveness you'd like to see in a speed back. Also, as a speed back with the best speed in the draft (unofficially clocked at 4.20), he doesn't have great hands in the passing game. As with a lot of backs in this class, people will look at his overall athletics and draft him based on that. Scouts do not like his potential at the next level, but because teams love to value athleticism on their squad, I see Woods getting taken in the fifth round.

    El Wilder (6'1", 212, Buffalo, #16 HB, #156 overall): Wilder is another enigma in the draft. He's a wild card in the return game at Buffalo, getting 2 kickoff returns and a punt return for touchdowns in 7 games this year already. He's a lightning rod there, but if you look at his measurables such as 40 yard dash time (4.56 time unofficial), he doesn't stack up with other backs in this class. Combine that with a questionable film study routine and character issues (he had academic ineligibility issues his junior year at Buffalo) and you have a great return guy that can also be a #3 back in the league if taken care of. I say he goes late in the seventh round if at all.

    Ashton Wheeler (6'1", 209, Troy, #17 HB, #157 overall): Wheeler is nothing more than a speed back out of Troy. While he has some elusiveness and ability athletically, his practice habits are, in a word, horrible. I went down to Troy to do some personal scouting on this guy, hearing how quick and elusive he was. Well, based on my own sight, he's got sparks of brilliance but lots of issues to deal with on the field as far as his attitude goes. His speed will get him drafted in the fifth to sixth round, but his potential and work ethic will get him out of the league sooner rather than later.

    Beau Shipman (5'10", 221, Memphis, #18 HB, #160 overall): Shipman, playing for a low quality Memphis team, is their only bright spot this season. In a 1-6 season so far, Shipman has run for 987 yards and 12 touchdowns. However, he has issues as far as ball security and hands in the passing game. His top end speed is not high end, and his ability to run over defenders is average at best. Shipman is a good back at the collegiate level. However, his talent level will not make it in the OMFL. Shipman is a high character guy but not a draftable guy in the league.

    Zach Lewis (6'0", 212, USC, #19 HB, #169 overall): How the mighty school of USC has fallen. Since sanctions have been imposed the talent level has fallen off. Lewis has been good though on a still talented USC squad, gaining 812 yards in 6 games with a 7.3 yards per carry average. He has the speed to get by in the OMFL. Unlike most other backs in this area, however, he doesn't have much ball security issues. He is not a quality receiver, however, and does not catch the ball well out of the backfield. With all his elusiveness, however, he does not have good return instincts. Without a lot of potential for much growth according to most scouts, I see him going very late in the day, if at all.

    Keith Newman (6'1", 215, Cincinnati, #20 HB, #194 overall): Keith Newman has a lot of talent. He's got the size and the ability to be a force. However, his attitude toward football is horrid. He doesn't seem to want to be a good player or try hard to be a good player. He is under the illusion he is a first round draft pick talent. He is not. He is elusive, but has hands issues that add up to not holding onto the ball in the running game while not being able to help out in the Cincinnati passing attack. He's also been hurt through three of the Bearcats' first six games with lingering injuries. He tends to not want to be on the field if he's not 100%, and he tends to say he's not 100% a lot of the time. All the skill, but a poor attitude makes him a non-drafted player come draft day.

    There you have it. My LONG list of running backs is complete. Tune in next time for my tight ends class of players, then it'll be the wide receivers.

    Keep up with all draft coverage/OMFL.com blogs on our sister website:
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  17. weblink21

    weblink21 Walk On

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    Great work on all of this Win
     
  18. weblink21

    weblink21 Walk On

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    Looks like you can probably use DT Storm Williams as a 3-4 DE. He is only 6'0'' 294lbs. I am not sure what the cap penalty would be to move him to DE, but he fits the mold.
     
  19. weblink21

    weblink21 Walk On

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    Where are the updates Win? Draft is getting close. Need my write ups! :thumbsup:
     
  20. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    Well, you've motivated me to try and finish the master list. If I do that, instead of position by position I'll release them in packs of 20. I still have LOTS to do though..... :( But I'll try to get a list for you all by season's end.
     
  21. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    Buckman's Big Board: Players 1-20

    by Antoine Buckman
    Blogger, OMFL.com

    With the draft quickly coming up and deadlines nearing, instead of a position by position breakdown as previous articles have been, I'm going to instead release my "Big Board" twenty picks at a time. These are my top twenty guys:

    Aspha Savage (5'10”, 210, Florida, #1 SS, #1 overall): The best player in the draft is Savage, a smallish safety out of Florida. He is quick but not overly fast, running a 4.51 40 yard dash time. However, this kid is instinctive as they come at the safety position in college. He's possibly one of the best ever to attend Florida, and considering who has come out of that institution, that is saying a lot. Savage has 86 tackles, 12 pass deflections, 8 interceptions, and 4 sacks. In the SEC. This kid is a playmaker. He has the coverage skills of a corner, the hitting power of a strong safety, and the instincts of a free safety. If this kid doesn't go #1 overall in April's draft, he will go in the top 5 – guaranteed.


    K.C. Williams (6'2”, 241, Florida, #1 RE, #2 overall): Williams is another reason why the Florida Gators are undefeated after 10 games this season. This kid is lights out – when he's on the field. Athletically speaking, there is no question Williams is the fastest and most talented edge rusher in the draft. He has the speed and moves to get around any tackle he comes across. His instincts are unmatched in his position range. He has excellent pursuit skills to the ball but does have issues getting off blocks from quality lineman or double teams. His biggest question mark is the injury bug – his junior and senior years have been marred by ankle, shoulder, and hamstring injuries. If he can stay healthy, though, he will be a consistent force in the OMFL at the defensive end position. His injury woes lower his draft stock, but his athleticism will get him drafted in the top 10 at worst.


    Shaynon Douglas (6'4”, 267, Alabama, #1 LE, #3 overall): Douglas is another SEC defensive guy that is dominating anyone that lines up across from him. While a bit small to play the 3-4 defensive end spot, he mans it well in Alabama's scheme, with great leverage and pass rush skills shown. He is much more of a bull rush specialist than a swim move guy, but can escape from double teams in a 4-3 scheme, where he's slated to go in the OMFL. With his run stuffing capability from the end spot as well as pass rush ability and big amounts of potential at the next level, Douglas could be special at the next level. He is not fast, however; that is his one knock. He clocked in the 40 yard dash (unofficially) at 5.1 seconds. Not good if you are looking for a speed end. However, his overall polish will get him drafted in the top ten.


    Storm Williams (6'0”, 294, Texas Tech, #1 DT, #4 overall): Storm Williams is one of the strongest, if not the strongest, guy coming out in the draft at any position. This guy squats over 900 pounds. This guy is a gym rat and a film study nut. He is not fast in the interior, nor is he quick. But he will not be moved: not by one guy, two guys, even THREE guys have tough times moving him from the interior. He has the best technique of any defensive line player in this draft: the way he works inside with his hands and leverage, as well as his almost unnatural strength, allows him to be a run stopping force inside. His pass rush skills, excluding bull rush moves, are non-existent. This guy reminds scouts a bit of last year's beast of a DT, Ndamukong Suh. He doesn't have the finesse or speed of Suh, but he's dang close. This guy will go to a defensively challenged team early. This guy will go in the top 10 to a team that can immediately say their run defense just improved by 10 places.


    Tre Williams (6'5”, 264, Wisconsin, #2 RE, #5 overall): Tre Williams is an overlooked defensive end at Wisconsin due to the success of K.C. Williams at Florida. Tre's pass rush moves and athleticism are on par with K.C. Athletically, they almost mirror each other. Where Tre falters a bit from K.C, however, is in the ability to get off blocks. Tre tends to disappear when a running back or tight end is slated to chip him as he rushes the edge. They tend to slow him down and after a few plays, he tends to hoof it a bit. His talent is there, and with a good defensive line coach, they can teach him proper hand usage and leverage so he can get off blocks a bit better. However, his low upper body strength will keep him from being an elite block shedder. His pass rush skills and ability to get on the field will get him drafted very early, and I think he will go before K.C. I see him going no later than the 5th pick in the draft.


    Dorian Hill (6'0”, 210, North Colorado, #1 FS, #6 overall): While playing both strong and free safety at small FCS school North Colorado, scouts have questioned whether or not Dorian has the ability to get it done at the highest level. I went and watched him play a game this season, and I have to say – this kid is for real. He is a man amongst boys in the Big Sky conference. He loves contact and tackling, and still needs some polish in the coverage game to become an elite safety in the OMFL. He has the speed, the work ethic, and the want to be better, though – he found out about me and asked me what he could do to raise his draft stock. I see him starting as a strong safety early, but transitioning – and transitioning well – to an elite, centerfield type free safety in the mold of Darren Sharper, but with more speed. Hill will go late in the top 10, but will definitely enjoy hitting the stage on the first day of the draft.


    Jamarcus Austin (6'2", 222, Auburn, #1 QB, #7 overall): Austin is the number one quarterback coming out this year, bar none. As I said in my top ten discussion, Austin is a big play quarterback who can be a dual threat with his legs as well as his big arm. He throws well on the run, and has great technique with his play action fakes (when he's asked to do that). However, his short throwing accuracy is a concern as he has now only completed 42% of his passes under 10 yards through 7 games. With an overall completion percentage of 57% in the Auburn spread option offense, he can hit the deep ball better than any quarterback that has come out in the last 15 years. I say this guy goes later in the first round because of that short throwing accuracy issues, in the 13-17 range.


    Aukeem Tigner (6'7”, 290, Tennessee-Martin, #1 LT, #8 overall): Tigner is a force at small Tennessee-Martin, but scouts are very concerned if he dominance in small school settings will translate to OMFL success. Scouts just need to look at the tape – this guy is as technically sound as they come out of college. While he is not totally polished and needs to work on his pass blocking footwork, he is by far the most polished tackle coming out this year, and he will be a top left tackle in the OMFL for a long time. Injuries are a slight issue, as his senior year has been a bit marred by a lingering quad injury, but throughout his career he's been a stout, injury-free guy. Any team needing protection for a blind side of their franchise quarterback, draft Tigner and be secure that he will be there for a long time. He will go in the top 5 easy, as most teams that will be here will need a guy of his caliber.


    Stehle Jones (6'3”, 302, Notre Dame, #1 LG, #9 overall): Stehle Jones is a guy who has relied on his strength and leverage to get the job done at Notre Dame. The problem with that setup is that in the OMFL, guys cannot get away with just using their natural talent. When watching the tape, though, you see glimpses of technique; however, he is very raw coming out. The fact that he is in the top 10 overall speaks to his talent level. A good offensive line coach can help this kid out as he needs a lot of work in overall technique in the passing game and running game. He also lacks a mean streak that most top flight guards have and doesn't blow people off the ball like a guy of his side should. With a year or two to develop, though, this kid will be a beast for whatever team takes him. Because of his position and lack of polish, look for Jones to fall into the mid-lower 1st round as teams get more polished or more athletic guys before Jones.


    Benji Tuiloma (6'2”, 315, Stanford, #1 C, #10 overall): Let it be known that I love this kid coming out from the University of Stanford. He's a bright kid who is mean on the field and has a quick first step. He's not overly agile or fast, but his quick acceleration once he snaps the ball gets him in position to make plays in the running and passing game. His strength is his greatest asset as well as his acceleration; his overall technique is still not quite where it could be. But with his intellect and mean streak, he will be a success in the OMFL for many years and be an anchor for an offensive line in a year or two. I see him going in the same range as Jones from Notre Dame – mid to late first round as teams get more polished players or more athletic players.


    Bensly Blake (6'2”, 198, Southern Miss, #1 WR, #11 overall): The first wide receiver off the board comes out of Conference USA and the University of Southern Mississippi. Blake is nowhere near the fastest guy in the wide receiving class. However, he has by far the surest hands coming out. No one is as good as this guy when it comes to catching the ball clean. Most of his drops come when he is covered tightly by a quality corner, as he doesn't do well with concentrating on the ball in tight man coverage. He runs crisps routes at the collegiate level, which will only enhance his draft stock to a team needing a number one receiver. His ability to get off press coverage is very good, and he uses his hands well to clean off attempts to adjust his route. His vertical has been measured at 37 ½ inches, which is quite good as well. Blake is a guy who will make an immediate impact to a team needing a future #1 receiver, and will go in the middle of the first round.


    Michael Koyack (5'11”, 195, Virginia, #1 P, #12 overall): Yes, a punter. You read that right. With the importance of special teams in the OMFL and field position being a premium, punters and kickers are very important no matter what people say. Koyack has averaged 49.1 NET yards per punt this season, with 21 of his 78 punts being downed inside the 20 yard line. 49.1 NET yards. Not gross yards, which, if you are wondering, is 54.7 yards per punt. This guy will not get drafted early, if at all, but ANY team needing a powerful, accurate leg in the punting game, give this guy a look. He could be the next Ray Guy. If you don't know who Ray Guy is, go look him up, kids.


    Titus Ridder (6'0”, 238, UCLA, #1 MLB, #13 overall): Ridder is what you would call the “prototypical” middle linebacker in a 4-3 setup – he is fast (runs a 4.39 40 unofficial), quick to read and react, plays adequate coverage, and roams sideline to sideline on every play. Ridder honestly has no real weakness in his game: he has the speed, strength, and athletic skills to make any play, he has the smarts to read a play and react to it properly, and he has the technique to make sound tackles and wrap up defenders. Ridder also has never missed a game since he walked on the campus of UCLA. He started as a true freshman. That is impressive endurance. In fact, this year, he's sat out a total of 2 plays this entire season out of a possible 310 plays run by the UCLA defense. This guy is as sure a thing as there is in the world of draft analysis. Ridder better have a nice suit – he's going top 5 in this draft. Easy.


    Kyle Myers (6'4”, 325, Washington, #2 LG, #14 overall): Kyle Myers is one of my “enigma” guys. If you watch tape of him in games, he is solid with his technique and footwork at the guard position. What hampers him a bit is that he is a nice guy off the field, and on it. He is always helping up the opposition after attempting to smash him just the play before. While this is all good in the real world, he just doesn't blow people up at all off the line. He'll move them around, and with the technique he exhibits, he gets the job done. But your elite guards in the OMFL punish interior lineman – they drive them into the ground. Myers, I think (and most scouts agree with me) will NEVER be that guy. However, he will be a very solid guard, even with some limited athletic ability. In a good scheme, with a good line coach, he will be a Pro-Bowl guard. I see him going mid-late first round like most interior offensive linemen in this draft that are high quality.


    Sergio Brown (6'2”, 228, Kansas, #2 FS, #15 overall): Sergio Brown has always been a solid player in his 3 years at Kansas (his first year was at a junior college). He's got good speed, good acceleration, good coverage skills, and is a solid tackler. He's good at a lot of things – however, he is not spectacular at any one of them. He is still a solid safety that will be a good, if not great, safety at the next level. He has soft hands and great instincts to go and get the ball. He will be a good centerfield-type of free safety at the next level given a year or two to get better at playing the deep middle zone of the field. I see him going late in the first round to a good team that has depth at the safety position.


    Aaron Scott (6'3”, 201, #2 WR, #16 overall): Aaron Scott is a speed freak. He runs a 4.25 40 yard dash. He's quick, elusive, and has great hands, though not as good as Bensly Blake from Southern Miss. However, where he lacks Blake's skills is in making a great catch: Scott will make a lot of the normal catches (as Blake will), but Blake seems to be involved in every big Southern Miss play, while Scott just tends to get flummoxed on the big play catches. He also, like Blake, suffers when man coverage is called, as he loses concentration and does not catch well in traffic. Scott is a beast getting off press coverage, however, as when the defense calls a soft cover 2, Scott eats it up. Scott will go at worst in the middle of the first round.


    Brandon Hiller (6'3”, 235, Florida, #1 ROLB, #17 overall): Brandon Hiller is one of the many reasons that Florida is #1 in the recent BCS standings. Hiller, a converted safety since the start of his sophomore year, is fast at the outside linebacker position, and has the instincts to run sideline to sideline and loves contact. While his pass rush skills are not as polished as some of the guys at the outside linebacker position coming out, and he isn't the best at getting off solid blocking from offensive linemen and tight ends, he is superior to most of the CORNERBACKS in this draft at coverage. His background as a safety makes him ideal to play in a Tampa 2 style defense. However, with some proper tutelage, this guy can develop into a beast of a rush linebacker in a 3-4 scheme as well. I see this guy going early in the draft because of his coverage skills and overall versatility and potential, and possibly as high as the 5-8 range. He will go no lower than the middle of the first round.


    Jaqwaylin Lewis (6'3”, 232, Clemson, #2 MLB, #18 overall): While Titus Ridder has been garnering the headlines with his elite level athleticism at the middle linebacker position, Jaqwaylin Lewis out of the ACC has been a solid player as well. While not possessing the speed or acceleration of Ridder, he possesses all the football instincts and skills that Ridder has and that owners in the OMFL like at the next level. He shows a real hunger to learn and get better because he knows he isn't the best athlete on the field, which will only help his draft stock. Scouts love his tenacity to study film and his ability to play coverage in a cover 2 type scheme, and that potential and coverage skills will earn him a good spot in the draft. Because of the league's love with speedy linebackers on the outside, Lewis will fall a bit, but he will go in the first round of the draft this April.


    D'Ambro Buie (6'3”, 358, Cincinnati, #2 DT, #19 overall): The big plug out of Cincinnati will be a force in the OMFL for years to come. Buie is a prototypical 3-4 nose tackle with his size, but he is a rare breed in that he is lightning quick off the line and is one of the fastest guys you will ever see at his size. At 358 pounds, Buie has run a 4.75 40 yard dash. You read that right: 4.75 seconds. 358 pounds. He is a freak of nature, but with his large frame you would like him to be stronger at the point of attack than he is. He tends to have poor leverage and gets caught out of position sometimes. However, he has the want to learn to get better with technique, which can make up a little for his lack of upper body strength. His size says 3-4, but his strength level says 4-3 defensive tackle. Either way, Buie will be a good player for someone drafting late in the first round.


    Zach Jackson (6'6”, 326, Virginia, #2 LT, #20 overall): Zach Jackson plays in a spread offense pass happy setup in Virginia, and it shows in his technique. He is used to playing in the two point stance, and his pass blocking footwork as such is good for coming into the league. He is a naturally strong guy, so he can manhandle most defenders that line up across from him, keeping them out of the stat book. However, his run blocking footwork and technique in the three point stance needs work, and while he is eager to learn, scouts feel he doesn't have as good of a ceiling as Aukeem Tigner at the tackle position. That doesn't mean he is limited; just not as high of a ceiling as Tigner. Scouts still feel that with proper coaching and playtime against the best the OMFL has to offer, this kid will rise to the challenge and become a good to great left tackle in the league. I see him going late in the first round, as typically in the league offensive linemen tend to stay on the board longer while skill players are being picked up. He will not fall into the second round with this talent, though.

    My next report will include big board prospects 21-40. Hope you enjoy it.

    Keep up with all OMFL.com coverage on the sister website:
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  22. weblink21

    weblink21 Walk On

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    Nice! Keep em coming!

    I know a guy that has KC Williams in their franchise. He is a monster. If he didnt have injury concerns, he would be a top DE in the league next season. If he stays healthy defensive ROY. Web guarantee!
     
  23. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    If you notice, Web, I have went away from the stats quoting and went more Mel Kiper-esque with talking about potential and skills. Trying to shorten these up so I can keep motivated and keep them coming.

    21-40 should be out shortly then I'll be tapped for the evening I think. I'll try to keep them coming if the fans keep wanting it.
     
  24. Winuvas

    Winuvas OMFL Jets

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    Buckman's Big Board: Players 21-40

    by Antoine Buckman
    Blogger, OMFL.com

    So the top twenty wasn't enough for you draft guys to get your fill? Well, then, without further ado, here comes my analysis of my big board, picks twenty-one through forty:

    Roderick Saunders (6'2”, 311, SMU, #3 LG, #21 overall): Saunders does not possess the intelligence of the other top two guards in the draft as he's only been playing organized football for 5 years. However, he displays natural ability and good footwork like a guy who's been playing twice that long. He's a big, strong kid who uses leverage to its fullest in both the run and pass game. However, he does not possess that “mean streak” that coaches and scouts like to see from the elite level offensive linemen. While he will be a good to great guard in the OMFL, he won't blow people off the ball and pancake a lot of guys on the other side. That will drop him a little bit, but with his raw ability and growth room left to get better, he will get a look at the bottom of the first to early second round, and deservedly so.


    J.D. Nealy (6'1”, 220, Notre Dame, #3 FS, #22 overall): Nealy is a classic “tweener” type safety – he has the skills in tackling technique to be a run support safety, and he has the skills to play back in coverage and be a ballhawk – but he isn't great at either one. Nealy played both strong and free safety at Notre Dame, and his athleticism grades out better at the strong safety position. However, as a free safety he will be excellent as well, as he possesses great instincts, average hands, and has the speed to cover hash to hash as a deep safety in centerfield. No matter how Nealy is used in the OMFL, he will be a successful player, and as such, he will hear his name called in the middle to late first round.


    Martwon Baldwin (6'0”, 225, South Carolina, #4 FS, #23 overall): Baldwin is almost a carbon copy of J.D. Nealy out of Notre Dame – minus the football smarts. He transitioned to safety from cornerback due to his lack of man coverage skills, and it was a good transition – but he is still learning how to play safety. One thing he does have that you want in a good centerfield type free safety is soft hands. He is a guy who could play wide receiver if he learned how to run routes; he's got that good of hands. He also possesses great return instincts, so a team that has a quality free safety can use him in kick/punt return as well and get a solid return, as Baldwin possesses electrifying speed and football instincts with the ball in his hands. He is a natural playmaker who, with time to learn the position, could be a steal in the draft late in the first round.


    Jalen Driskell (6'4”, 249, UCLA, #1 TE, #24 overall): The top tight end off the board out of UCLA is in the mold of the new type of tight end in the league – fast, can catch the ball, and be a force in the passing game. Driskell has the skills in reading coverages and running routes of some veteran wide receivers in the OMFL now. That combined with his high ceiling makes him a very desirable commodity, as his skill set reminds a lot of scouts of a faster Dallas Clark – and that is a very good thing. Teams needing a tight end that can be a real threat in the passing game take note and get Driskell early as possible. I see Driskell not falling past the late first round. I don't think he'll go below 20th overall.


    Cory Tartacoff (6'4”, 292, Tennessee, #1 RT, #25 overall): Tartacoff is not the strongest guy at the tackle position; in fact, he's one of the weaker tackles coming out. However, he possesses excellent footwork in both the running and passing game, which makes him valuable as a starter right away. Cory also has a mean streak a mile wide and loves to make defenders look silly laying on the ground while his quarterback or running back looks good. His upper body technique does need work in the running and passing game, but his strength and footwork are a good solid base to build on, and he will be a solid tackle for many years to the OMFL team that gets him. I see him going late in the first round.


    Jake Carver (5'10”, 208, Penn State, #1 HB, #26 overall): Carver is an athletic specimen at the place known for sending linebackers to the pros. Carver runs very well when he gets to top speed, and he gets to top speed very quickly. He's got great hands out of the backfield for a running back, and he understands how routes are run pretty good for a back coming into the OMFL from a spread option Penn State offense. But Antoine, I hear you asking, what about his stats, man? Well, there are none. He blew out his ACL in the first game of the season, ending his season and his Penn State career. My biggest fears about this kid are his lack of power running ability and his inability to stay on the field. His junior year was marred by knee, ankle, and shoulder injuries. There is also a concern about his hands in the running game – in 305 total carries at Penn State, he's had 18 fumbles. Unacceptable for a kid who can carry the rock with the best of them. My guess is that he'll be drafted high because of his overall athletic ability, in the late first round, but be careful what you get here – could be a special player, or a good way to get a GM fired.

    Brandon Boutte (5'10”, 222, Nebraska, #2 HB, #27 overall): Boutte came into Nebraska as a highly touted, but undersized, quarterback from the Midwest. Nebraska converted him to a halfback early his sophomore season after a redshirt year, and they never felt bad about that since on both sides. This year, Boutte has run 89 times through 7 games for 854 yards and 8 touchdowns. Boutte also has been a safety valve in the passing game, catching 14 balls for another 175 yards and a touchdown. He even runs the “Wild Husker” formation and can throw out of it fairly effectively. Another good thing to note: He's only fumbled once his entire collegiate career. Once. While his hands and route running are not what Jake Carver's are, Boutte is a more complete back and can dazzle people with his speed and ability to run over people when he has to, although it's not his favorite way to take on tacklers. He's rather dance and dazzle them with his agility. Boutte will go in the top ten in this draft because of his overall speed (fastest running back in the draft at a 4.21, unofficial), athleticism, and ability to play the wildcat formation in the OMFL is only a bonus.


    DeAndre Jones (6'4”, 229, Michigan, #TE, #28 overall): DeAndre Jones is like most of the tight ends in this draft – quick guys who are mostly receiving threats out of the popular spread option offense ran by most teams in the collegiate level. Jones has all the quickness and skills that Jalen Driskell has except for one key skill that hampers him early in his career – the desire to go across the middle. Jones fancies himself a slot receiver more than a tight end, and tight ends have to be good at catching in the middle of the field where contact is expected and delivered. Jones doesn't seem to like to get his jersey dirty, and that will handcuff him a bit. But Jones will still go high in the draft, and if he's there late in the first round, I'll be shocked.


    Ladarius Coxson (5'11”, 226, Clemson, #2 SS, #29 overall): The ACC has a special safety coming out this year in Ladarius Coxson, who is leading the ACC with 83 tackles, and 17 of those are tackles for loss. From the safety position, that is impressive. Coxson is a guy who has the speed to keep up with all but the most fleet-footed of receivers, but does not have the coverage skills at this point in his development to do so. He does, however, have the best hands of any safety coming out in this draft, period. He has soft hands and catches the ball well, with 6 interceptions to his credit. Where this guy really shines is athleticism and tackling ability – this guy loves the big hit and isn't shy about running up to get one. He consistently has highlight-reel type hits on the ACC website as plays of the week, and he is solid fundamentally at tackling. With some teaching on the fundamentals of coverage ability, he could become a solid all-around safety, but for now, he is an OMFL ready prospect at the strong safety position, and could be a sleeper 1st round pick. If he is there in the second round, this could be the steal of the draft in my opinion.


    Jacobie Barclay (6'3”, 290, Virginia, #1 RG, #30 overall): Jacobie Barclay is as raw as it gets as far as talent goes. He walked onto the field in Virginia his junior year and hadn't played football since Pop Warner. He has natural strength and quickness and is light on his feet, and displays footwork and strength at the guard position that is rare for kids coming out of college. Where he needs a year to develop though is his upper body technique: he is still very raw and is beaten easily by defensive guys with good hands that can shed a block with good strength. His potential will get him drafted, but his skills in the here and now will drop him a lot. I see him going in the middle of the 2nd round as teams gets more polished players, but Barclay could, with the right team, be the steal and sleeper of the draft.


    Jermaine Baker (5'11”, 209, Kansas, #3 HB, #31 overall): This guy makes Kansas' offense go, go, go. He enjoys contact in Kansas' power running pro-style attack, and it shows. Baker has 108 rushes for almost 900 yards, with 7 touchdowns. He has 608 yards of his 897 after first contact. Baker hunts people down and gets his pads low and initiates contact better than almost anybody in this draft (I would personally say he's behind Rashard House in running after contact), and he has great, but not elite, speed to hit the outside runs like the stretch and toss that are prevalent in the OMFL. The only concern about Baker is his hands – he drops too many balls out of the backfield to be a concern for defenses in the passing game, and he has fumbled 8 times this season, costing Kansas some games. The kid has a lot of potential according to scouts, so look for him to go in the first round, perhaps late in the first round.


    Reshard St. Saint (5'10”, 177, Oklahoma State, #1 CB, #32 overall): The first cornerback off the Big Board comes in St. Saint, the small Oklahoma State star. Reshard possesses that speed and quick burst off the snap you want in a possible shutdown corner, but lacks the polished man coverage skills to be that guy day one with his new club. Oklahoma State played about 60% zone coverage, and he has more experience in that setup and is better suited at that role. However, scouts love his ability to read coverages and adapt quickly to new schemes, and Reshard has a 3.97 GPA in Chemistry and graduated a year early. Saint has the smarts to learn any system he goes in and the desire to be one of the best in the OMFL, and that will get him drafted no later than the middle of the first round.


    Munchie Cosh (6'5”, 232, Kentucky, #3 TE, #33 overall): Cosh is probably the fastest tight end coming out of the college ranks this year, and by tape I've seen, I think he has the best hands of any tight end coming out of the draft. What he lacks is the skills to get the dirty yards over the middle, as he was used mainly in the slot in Kentucky's offense. He has supreme route running knowledge as a tight end, which is a plus for teams looking to use Cosh as a receiving threat. Cosh will go early in the 2nd round to a team needing another receiving threat, and he will excel in that role at the OMFL level.


    Deshun Ivory (6'0”, 236, Alabama, #2 ROLB, #34 overall): Deshun is what we could call a “prototypical” 3-4 OLB. While not as big as your typical 3-4 OLB, he has excellent pass rush skills as he was a defensive end in high school before bulking up and moving to OLB when he committed to Alabama. Ivory has great technique in getting off blocks by tight ends and tackles alike and has the speed and strength to go sideline to sideline and make a quality play. He lacks polish in playing coverage against anyone but the most average of pass catching running backs, but his tenacity at getting after the quarterback makes up for that threefold. Ivory will be a stout player in a 3-4 scheme, and I see him going middle of the first round as a result.


    Dion Cooper (6'5”, 285, Montana, #3 RE, #35 overall): Cooper is an ideal guy for those building a solid 3-4 defensive line, as Cooper has the size and strength to play and anchor the line in that role. He is not blessed with the speed of the top two right ends coming out, but he is blessed with strength and good ability to get leverage on most offensive linemen he encounters. Coming out of Montana, however, he will need to learn to face OMFL-level competition quickly, but he has the skills to do so. He doesn't have the ceiling of the guys above him, but his workmanlike attitude will serve him well, especially if a 3-4 team comes calling for his services. Cooper is a solid early to middle 2nd round pick for a 3-4 team needing a starter on the defensive line.


    Kendall Weatherspoon (6'1”, 244, Boston College, #1 LOLB, #36 overall): Weatherspoon is a guy that some scouts love and some scouts hate. With his size, you would expect him to be a good outside rusher in a 3-4 scheme. However, Weatherspoon is a converted safety, and he still loves to play in coverage on a slot receiver or speedy tight end. He was changed over due to his lack of speed in the back end of the secondary, but at the linebacker position he has above average, but not blazing, speed. He is one of the most technical tacklers coming out in the draft, and with his coverage skills, you can put Weatherspoon in man coverage against a slower slot receiver or tight end and not worry about it too much since he can cover well and if the receiver catches it, he will make the sure tackle. He takes great angles to the ball and runs sideline to sidelines well. His pass rush skills can be worked on, but his best fit would be in a scheme that allows him to cover guys and play the run. As such, I see him going early second round as his speed will keep his stock down.


    Gordon Roberson (6'2”, 290, Nebraska, #2 LE, #37 overall): Roberson is another guy at the defensive end position who would be a good 3-4 defensive end. He does not possess great athleticism, and tends to be a bit slow both coming off the ball and at top speed. He holds the point of attack well, however, and is a sure run stuffing end. He also has great hands and good technique with his swim move, and shows it a lot at Nebraska, where he has picked up 7 sacks in a 3-4 end role. Roberson has big time strength but not a lot of technique around the bull rush maneuver, but his ability to swim, read and react to the ball, and his overall strength make him an ideal fit in the 3-4. Scouts don't see him with a super high ceiling on potential in the OMFL, but he will become one of the best in the league in a few years. I see him going in the middle of the 2nd round, mainly because of atheticism deficiencies.


    Kenarious Fluellen (5'11”, 207, Washington, #4 HB, #38 overall): While Baker has been getting most of the attention because he's taken Kansas to a 4-2 start through 6 games, Fluellen has amassed better stats but gone unnoticed. Why? He's playing in Pac-10 land in Washington, and by the time he starts playing, most of the media markets are in bed. Fluellen has rushed for 961 yards on 101 rushes and 9 touchdowns, however, and 705 yards are after first contact. This is also more impressive because teams, knowing Fluellen is the Huskies' only option on offense, are stacking 8, even 9 guys in the box against Fluellen, and he STILL gets his yards. That's special. If you watch film, I'd say Fluellen has a faster overall speed, but Baker has the better first step and acceleration overall. Fluellen can catch a bit out of the backfield as well, getting 8 receptions for 91 yards. He's dropped a few passes on swing routes and such, so teams drafting Fluellen should not look to him to do that exclusively. Like Baker, I think Fluellen will go late in the first round or early in the second round due to his speed and overall ability. Scouts don't see as much potential in him as in Baker, so that drops Fluellen's stock as well.


    Tramon Edwards (6'2”, 299, Maryland, #3 DT, #39 overall): Tramon Edwards possesses excellent football instincts at the defensive tackle position. He shows great awareness and has a real feel for where the ball is heading and getting in the way of the ball. While not as fast as D'Ambro Buie, he has good speed for his size and has the strength and leverage to be a quality 4-3 defensive tackle. While tackling woes hurt his draft stock a bit, he is the most polished pass rusher coming out of the draft at the tackle position. Scouts are high on his work ethic, so expect Tramon Edwards to go in the middle of the 2nd round to a team needing depth at the defensive tackle position.


    Antoine Bell (6'0”, 201, N.C. State, #3 WR, #40 overall): Bell is not the fastest receiver in the draft, but Antoine understands his position as good, if not better, than anyone coming out in the wide receiver class. Bell is a great route runner coming out of college, something most kids struggle with coming to the OMFL. He doesn't mind going over the middle and getting those dirty yards in traffic. He has excellent leverage and strength in beating press coverage, and he has more than a few catches on the team website showcasing his big play ability. Bell reminds scouts a lot of a receiver that few get mentioned with – Jerry Rice. Bell works CONSTANTLY to get better and strives to be the best at the collegiate ranks. His only hangup is his hands, as he does tend to let easy passes get to his chest and bounce off to the grass. With proper position coaching, though, Bell could live up to that Rice comparison. His speed will keep him out of the first round, but in the second round, Bell could easily be one of the top sleepers of this draft.

    My next report will include big board prospects 41-60. Hope you enjoy it.

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  25. BadaBing319

    BadaBing319 OMFL Broncos / PMFL Eagles

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,409
    Wow, tremendous work Win - great read. Should help us all get ready for the upcoming draft...
     

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