Coaching U7 girls soccer team.. need advice

Discussion in 'The Cheap Seats' started by RynoAid, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. RynoAid

    RynoAid ..

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    Coaching U7 girls soccer team.. need advice

    I know we have some youth coaches out there... I've been hornswaggled into coaching my daughter's under 7 soccer team and need some tips/pointers about how to run a practice for that age group.

    any tips/drills/ideas or experiences you've had would be appreciated.
     
  2. Blaza

    Blaza In Arsene Wenger I Trust

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    You know I'm a big footie head and played up through college. For youth ball, I think the most important things are getting as many touches on the ball as possible and doing your best to get them to stay in a relative formation. I would go with something simple like 4-4-2 and encourage them to 'stay in their zones'. It will be tough for U7s but if you drill it they will get it. With kids I usually break practice up into formation work, passing, shooting, heading, and scrimmage play.


    As far as touches, cones are your best friend. Have them stand 10 yards apart and just pass it back and forth, back and forth. Encourage passing with the inside of the foot as this makes it way easier for them to control where the ball goes. Having them do zig zags in and out of cones will help with their close control. Kids like competitions so you you can do a relay race in which you split up two teams and have the girls dribble up to the cone, around it, and back before tagging hands for the next girl to go. If you wanted, you could make it so that the girls have to wait on your whistle do go, that way you could rig it so that 'we are all winners'.

    Thats all I got for now.
     
  3. Blaza

    Blaza In Arsene Wenger I Trust

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    One other thing I will add. I coach U14s so you may not experience this as much, but parents can be a real pain in the ass sometimes.

    Everyone thinks they are Jose Mourinho and their kid is Landon Donovan. Either get a thick skin or start thinking of the kindest ways to say STFU.
     
  4. Colemanchu

    Colemanchu GOAT SPLITTER

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    I was going to make fun of you for this but then I realized that coaching a bunch of little girls in soccer may be the bravest thing a person can do. Good luck with that. lol.
     
  5. BDSDIGITAL

    BDSDIGITAL One Time for your Mind

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    who????
     
  6. MaxATX34

    MaxATX34 Texas Football

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    U7 I doubt you will have much luck with formations. Are there even 11 players on the field? What size field is it?

    Id check and see if youre still playing on the small fields, because if you are youre going to be playing "amoeba" soccer. Where every player on the field is in one big blob following the ball up and down the field.

    -Make sure they know which goal they are defending/scoring in.
    -practice kicking the ball (not shooting or passing necessarily. just kicking lol dont let them toe-poke)
    -the drills listed above are great. weave in between cones etc. i'd like to add the drill where each girl has a ball in front of them and you have them put their right foot on top of the ball, then quickly switch and put their left foot on top of the ball. have them do that left, right, left, right, left, right over and over for a few minutes every practice just to get comfortable with a ball at their feet.
    -line up 5 or 6 balls in front of a net, have them kick each ball, one after the other, and set them up for the next girl when theyre done(if this takes too long have a couple of girls set up the balls) teach them to put their left foot right next to the ball when they run up for a kick (for right footed girls, opposite for lefties). teach them to keep their head down when they kick, and if they lean back the ball goes up high. if they lean forward the ball stays low.

    -also, while youre playing, have one girl (maybe one of your best players) play the point. meaning have her shadow the last(deepest) defender of the opposing team. I dont know if they are going to be calling offsides in U7 games, but its better to get them used to that rule now anyway. and having a girl play the point will no doubt lead to some goals at this level.

    -do you have goalies? if so that is going to be a challenge. if you do have a goalie, just make sure she knows when she should/shouldnt punt/throw/charge an attacker.

    i hope some of this helps. there are a lot of coaching videos and stuff out there that are really helpful. they are 5 and 6 year olds right? i wouldnt take it too seriously. just try to help them understand the game a little bit and try to keep them from getting hurt lol. even the "good" players at this age arent very good.
     
  7. tuco418

    tuco418 Older and wiser than you

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    I coached last year, here are a couple of great drills

    Sharks and minnows- Players (minnows) all start at one line and attempt to advance the ball to another. Coaches (sharks) apply pressure and try to take the ball away. Any one caught becomes a shark.

    Cream the coach (very popular)- Within a desinated area, have all players try to kick the ball at coaches as they move around. It's great for their ball handling and your exercise.
     
  8. Timpegoose

    Timpegoose Walk On

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    I've been an assistant coach with my little brother's team since they were u-8 (they're 13 now), and the biggest challenge I had was keeping their attention. At that age, their attention span is next to nothing so trying to mix up the drills or what they're doing within the same drill is key.

    I also agree with Blaza about them getting as many touches on the ball as possible. One of the things I would suggest is doing "skill drills" before every practice for 5 minutes or so. This can include passing, alternating touching the top of the ball (Like what Blaza suggested), dribbling in place between your feet, dribbling down the field and back. Just simple things like that, that will help them get more touches on the ball and give you a chance to show them the right way to dribble, pass, etc. Hope this helps!
     
  9. bamagrad

    bamagrad Back to Back British Amateur Champion

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    Patience lots of Patience, remember these are 7 yr olds or younger so don't feel like u have to come out and try to win every game. if u have veterans on the team that will help cause they tend to help the younger players out. I know the feeling ryno i got hooked into it 2 yrs ago and we didn't win every game (we finished .500) it just amazed me how the veterans helped the younger players. then when my Best friend took over as coach he led them to the league title cause of the younger players having good tips from the veterans. plus if u have a few that feel they are the shit, i would divide up how to play them. My 1st gm it was a nightmare the Stars felt they all needed to touch the ball and not pass to the younger players. I now coach Upward soccer and Basketball & plus officiate sports ( excluding soccer). I teach the Teams the same thing i taught my 1st squad. Its a Team effort not a Star effort. There is no I in Team.
     
  10. Shaun Mason

    Shaun Mason Somebody you used to know.

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    LMAO at Ryno telling soccer moms to STFU.

    You have to say "STFU", LOL.
     
  11. JerzeyReign

    JerzeyReign #BeatOhio

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    I coached tee-ball a couple of years ago. Some of the drills mentioned may be too advanced for that age group (having a 7 year old step on a ball is not a good thing IMO) but some like setting the ball in front of the net are great.

    Just let them have fun. Their not out there competing. Their not out there to get better. They are out there to have fun... its cool to teach them some things but their a tad too young to start getting them ready for World Cup action
     
  12. Shaun Mason

    Shaun Mason Somebody you used to know.

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    I coach Little League (6,7,8) year olds, for what it's worth.

    Kids that young can learn. They are sponges and soak up things, it just has to be presented right. My Little League teams do relatively complicated tasks like throwing to the correct base, backing up throws, correct cut offs, etc. What you have to understand is that kids are VISUAL. If you want them to learn, you might have to grab them by the shoulders and walk them where they are supposed to be. If you say "Your supposed to back up the short stop!" it isn't going to help.

    The most important thing is to learn to be competitive, but respectful. Your teams should ALWAYS want to to win, and hate losing BUT should be able to understand and congratulate the opponent when they lose.

    I've had the pleasure of learning to coach from two VERY experienced coaches (50+ years LL between them), and kids CAN learn. The earlier they learn fundamentals the better they are later in life (talent allowing anyway) and less likely to get hurt.

    You have kids that age, so you know how to communicate. Just learning how to correlate that to sports is hard though.
     
  13. JerzeyReign

    JerzeyReign #BeatOhio

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    I guess its just different coaching philosophies. Just IMO, I think at that age they are just starting to participate in sports, winning or losing should be second fiddle. Teaching/wanting a kid to be competitive at that age is something I didn't teach my players. We played to have fun. We didn't even keep score for that age group. My theory is if a kid starts being concerned with winning or losing, the moment they start losing they may not be as interested in the sport any longer. Not every team can win.

    My 9-10 year team is where I started "preaching" fundamentals. That's when I started teaching fundamentals. Different ball game, if their not paying attention the ball could smack them in the face. My tee-ball team only had to get the ball back to me:). But I still don't preach winning or losing with them either. Taught 'em how to have fun. Keep their heads up no matter what and show sportsmanship.

    I do agree the kids soaking everything up though but I just feel as though certain situations (age groups) need to be handled differently.

    I can just picture Ryno now:

    [YOUTUBE]JQANbc7nPjY[/YOUTUBE]
     
  14. RynoAid

    RynoAid ..

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    the real Ryno in action.. The girls are 2-1.. we lost one 7-6 when we only had 6 girls.. (5 have to be on the field) and it was 100 degrees... they were so tired. The other games we won 8-0 and 6-3. We have some AWESOME players on our team, these girls are really good for their age.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. jms493

    jms493 Veteran Member

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    Good luck man....that would be a daytime nightmare for me.

    I would rather be one of the parents screaming on the side line "you don't know WTH your doing coach!"
     
  16. RynoAid

    RynoAid ..

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    they already know i don't have a clue what im doing.... :) but none of them want to do it so i never have any problems.
     
  17. Cimmy24

    Cimmy24 Candy Ass Self

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    Is that you calling for a sub? Need a little break?

    In all seriousness. Good luck with that, I give you major props. I played soccer up until high school when I decided to play football (part of me wishes I stayed with soccer) and my little brother plays, he's 14 and plays legit all year long up here in PA. Which means traveling all over the northeast PA and playing in dome's and rec buildings on indoor fields. I've grown into a big soccer fan and have always thought about coaching kids as my late grandfather coached me. He was born in Germany and lived there until about 50 years ago or so? So it's likely in his blood as well as mine...but there is one thing for certain...

    I don't know, if coaching u7 girls would keep me out of the clinic.
     

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