School Pride and Tradition

Discussion in 'The Pride' started by Mr2Bits, Jul 17, 2010.

  1. Mr2Bits

    Mr2Bits 352

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    School Pride and Tradition

    In this thread we will post things about our schools that make them great, or use it to tell each other about traditions that the general public or college football fan doesn't know about your school. We are all fans of college football, so this will be a great way to show off our pride and tradition.
     
  2. Mr2Bits

    Mr2Bits 352

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    Florida Tradition

    Perhaps one of the lesser known traditions (not to Florida fans themselves) about Florida is the singing of "We are the boys of old Florida" at the end of every 3rd quarter. Nothing like 90,000 strong snuggling up all close to each other in the Florida heat. The first time I experienced this tradition was as a Freshman in 1998 and it still gives me chills.

    [youtube]bvvBqJNlA5Q[/youtube]
     
  3. atlplayboy23

    atlplayboy23 Walk On

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    Florida State Tradition

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    A lot of people may not know about the Sod Cemetery. The Sod Cemetery is located on the practice field and it is a piece of sod taken from the opposing team when ever we win a road game where we are underdogs. Also now all bowl games are considered Sod games.
     
  4. Mr2Bits

    Mr2Bits 352

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    I know plenty about the history of Florida / Florida St. and I did not know this. Pretty cool stuff ATL. Anyone else want to throw down some school tradition?
     
  5. atlplayboy23

    atlplayboy23 Walk On

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    The last sod we got from you guys was our last win against yall. Rix to Sam game.
     
  6. TeXasfight33

    TeXasfight33 Walk On

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  7. Mr2Bits

    Mr2Bits 352

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    4th and 14 my ass...

    That killed me, but hey - what a stud!

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  8. Bighoff63

    Bighoff63 VA is coming your way!

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    You don't stomp on the Cardinal, every game that a team has done it in pregame Louisville has kicked the living crap out of the offending team. See 2006 Miami @ Louisville game highlights as the latest example.

    [YOUTUBE]<object width="640" height="505"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/jC9XJwMmKFY&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/jC9XJwMmKFY&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="505"></embed></object>[/YOUTUBE]

    It's not a tradition just yet it's all about pride baby!
     
  9. BigSmooth33

    BigSmooth33 Walk On

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    University of Michigan - Ann Arbor

    For me, University of Michigan football (and a good engineering school:thumbsup:) was the biggest draw for me to go there...

    I'd been going to games with my grandparents since I was 6, sitting way up at the top of the South end zone. Starting with Bo Schembechler, I was always infatuated with his grizzled approach to coaching and leading the University's football program.

    Some of the game day traditions I loved:
    1) Pre game playing of the Yellow and Blue.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=tlYUGfIYTbQ
    Kind of a corny song, but when they hit the final "HAIL", its AWESOME
    2)
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    Running out to the M GO BLUE sign at midfield... With the fight song playing loud as can be, not much gets me geared up for football like the entrance.
    3) The big house view in general... Walking up from the outside is a bit uninspiring... Looks like it could be a high school stadium... Then you get inside...
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    It's HUGE! And cramped...
    4) Tailgating on the U of M Golf Course... Just fun... Tackle football before the game, drinking after. Just a good time.

    I could go on and on, but these were just a few of my favorites about the games. Haven't had the luxury of going since I graduated and have moved around the country. Luckily for me and my wife, we will be going to our first game in Ann Arbor in about 6 years this year.

    I'm always more than happy to share (or brag:rolleyes:) about Ann Arbor and the gameday tradition/experience, so anyone else that would like some more, just let me know!
     
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  10. Mr2Bits

    Mr2Bits 352

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    I grew up a Michigan Fan (born in Southfield) and almost went there. I teach Latin and if I have kids who are interested in classics I have them apply there. Michigan has the best undergraduate classics program in the nation, and well, a lot of the best anything.
     
  11. ticketp1

    ticketp1 Walk On

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    The 12th Man

    At Texas A&M there are almost as many traditions as there are students. However, one of my favorites is the storied 12th Man student body at football games. The 12th Man is a term that was trademarked by and originated with Texas A&M University in 1922. Obviously many of you know what the 12th Man stands for, but you may not know how the term came about.

    The first recorded instance of the term "12th Man" being used was to describe E. King Gill and his actions in Dallas on 2 January 1922, at the Dixie Classic, the forerunner of the Cotton Bowl Classic. Texas A&M played defending national champion Centre College in the first post-season game in the southwest. In this hard fought game, which produced national publicity, an underdog Aggie team was slowly but surely defeating a team which boasted three All-Americans. Unfortunately, the first half produced so many injuries for A&M that Coach D. X. Bible feared he wouldn’t have enough men to finish the game, so, he called into the Aggie section of the stands for E. King Gill, a reserve who had left football after the regular season to play basketball. Gill, who was spotting players for reporters at the time and was not in football uniform, willingly volunteered and donned the uniform of injured player Heine Weir. When the game ended with an A&M victory, 22–14, E. King Gill was the only man left standing on the sidelines for the Aggies. Gill later said, "I wish I could say that I went in and ran for the winning touchdown, but I did not. I simply stood by in case my team needed me."[1] Although he did not actually play in the game, his readiness to play was noted. Since there were 11 men on the field, E. King Gill was the 12th Man, hence the term. Below is a photo of E. King Gill.

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    Here is a picture of the student section of the 12th man rocking on a fall Saturday. Texas A&M reserves the whole West Side of the Stadium for students. Over 25,000 students pack Kyle Field and stand the entire game in support of their Aggies...win, lose, or draw. When the fight song is played, the entire student body and all other fans lock arms and sway back and forth while singing the fight song. Having been on the sidelines when this occurs, I can honestly say it gives you chills. There are stories from back in the 80's & 90's during big games, that the actual stadium would shake while 85,000 Aggies swayed. As a former student and player I can only hope that A&M football will someday be back as a prominent player in college football.

    I hope you've enjoyed this little insight into one of my favorite Aggie traditions.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Mr2Bits

    Mr2Bits 352

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    Awesome.
     
  13. ChaoticUT

    ChaoticUT Life is Orange and White!

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    25,000 students? Thats unreal... some teams dont even get 25,000 fans
     
  14. ticapnews

    ticapnews Walk On

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    USC's nickname, "Trojans," originated in 1912.

    Up to that time, teams from USC were called the Methodists or Wesleyans and neither nickname was looked upon with favor by university officials. Athletic Director Warren Bovard, son of university president Dr. George Bovard, asked Los Angeles Times sports editor Owen Bird to select an appropriate nickname.

    "At this time, the athletes and coaches of the university were under terrific handicaps," Bird recalled. "They were facing teams that were bigger and better-equipped, yet they had splendid fighting spirit. The name 'Trojans' fitted them.

    "I came out with an article prior to a showdown between USC and Stanford in which I called attention to the fighting spirit of USC athletes and named them 'Trojan' all the time, and it stuck.

    "The term 'Trojan' as applied to USC means to me that no matter what the situation, what the odds or what the conditions, the competition must be carried on to the end and those who strive must give all they have and never be weary in doing so."


    -- USCTrojans.com
     
  15. ticketp1

    ticketp1 Walk On

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    Yup, the whole West Side which is in the picture is students.
     
  16. BigSmooth33

    BigSmooth33 Walk On

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    Michigan's #1 Jersey

    SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT FOR UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN NO. 1 FOOTBALL JERSEY
    The Scholarship Endowment for the University of Michigan's No. 1 football jersey was announced in April 2006. The charitable gift provides support to a student/athlete wearing the No. 1 football jersey. The scholarship endowment will recognize future athletes who demonstrate character and commitment both on and off the field. Athletes wearing the No. 1 jersey are selected by U-M's coaching staff.


    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/205011-the-controversy-over-the-no-1-jersey-at-michigan

    Recently, there has been no #1 jersey handed out... Roy Roundtree thought he may have a chance for his Junior season, but no one reached out to the talented wideout.
    http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...ants-to-grab-No-1-jersey&template=fullarticle
    2012, is another story...

    Roy Roundtree is the new #1 at the University of Michigan, carrying on a tradition for the top WR on the team. Anthony Carter, Derrick Alexander, David Terrell, and Braylon Edwards all touted the #1, and now it's Roundtree's to carry for his senior year.
     
  17. djnnfl

    djnnfl Walk On

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    Sweet! I was wondering if anyone was going to reach out to him!
     
  18. BigSmooth33

    BigSmooth33 Walk On

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    Well I've done in here in "The Pride" for Roundtree. I think he will get it his Junior year, but I changed it in the game for his senior season.
     
  19. djnnfl

    djnnfl Walk On

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    Nebraska's Blackshirts

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    The Blackshirt tradition is one of the richest at Nebraska. The dominant Blackshirt defenses over the past 40 years have led the Cornhuskers to five national championships and have provided a steady string of talent to the NFL. The photo above includes current NFL defenders Le Kevin Smith, Barrett Ruud, Josh Bullocks, Daniel Bullocks and Fabian Washington.
    History of the Blackshirts

    By Mike Babcock
    For Huskers.com

    Among Nebraska’s best-known traditions is that of the Blackshirts, the nickname for the Huskers’ defensive unit. The nickname, originally two words (Black Shirts), dates to Bob Devaney’s third season as coach and is derived from the black, pullover, contrast jerseys worn by defensive players in practice.

    Exactly when the jerseys were purchased is a matter of some debate, resulting from the disparity in recollections caused by the passing of time. The most likely time frame is the second week of the 1964 season, when Nebraska traveled to Minneapolis to play Minnesota.

    Changes in NCAA rules following the 1963 season allowed for a return to two-platoon football, but Devaney had played most of his starters on both offense and defense in the 1964 opener, a 56-0 victory against out-manned South Dakota at Memorial Stadium. On the Wednesday before the Minnesota game, however, Devaney announced the Huskers would use offensive and defensive units.

    "We just decided that we would be more efficient if we started platooning," Devaney told the Lincoln Star. Otherwise, he said, opponents would take advantage of the Huskers.

    A headline in that Friday’s Lincoln Star said: "Final Decision Made."

    The black pullovers, which distinguished defensive players from offensive players, were purchased at a local sporting goods store by assistant coach Mike Corgan, who was in charge of procuring equipment. He was known for his frugality, always looking for bargains.

    His purchase of the black pullovers "was an accident of availability," defensive line coach George Kelly once said. "I told Mike the only reason they had black ones was because they didn’t sell."

    The story was that the sporting goods store made Corgan a good deal.
    The way Kelly told the story, when players were practicing with the defense, they had worn gray pullovers. Then, when the team was divided into offensive and defensive units, the black pullovers were given only to first-team defenders, as a way to motivate those on the lower units.

    Initially, the black pullovers were distributed each day at practice and collected afterward. A player might have a black pullover one day and a gray one the next. They had to continually be earned.

    Mike Kennedy, a junior in 1964, was among those sent to the defense with the change to the two-platoon system. He was among the defensive starters for the Minnesota game.

    "We had no idea then of the tradition that was beginning," he said.

    Long-time Husker Sports Information Director Don Bryant credits much of the Blackshirt mystique to Kelly, who served on Devaney’s staff until 1968. Kelly and Jim Ross, who coached the defensive ends and backs, were often heard exhorting the "Black Shirts" during practices and scrimmages.

    The nickname caught on almost immediately. By mid-season, the Lincoln and Omaha newspapers were using it. "The defensive unit got its ‘Black Shirt’ tag because members wore black pullover shirts in practice," the Omaha World-Herald reported in its Oct. 19, 1964 edition.

    A sub-head in the Lincoln papers proclaimed: "Black Shirts Drawing Praise." The accompanying story credited Kelly and Ross with applying the nickname to the defenders.

    The tradition continued to grow during Monte Kiffin’s tenure as defensive coordinator (1973-76), earning national acclaim under Charlie McBride, defensive coordinator from 1982 to 1999.

    Devaney never conferred the title "defensive coordinator" on an assistant. Kiffin, Kelly’s successor as defensive line coach, was the first to have the title, in Tom Osborne’s first season.

    The tradition grew because of Nebraska’s defensive success. The Huskers ranked No. 2 nationally in total defense in 1964, No. 8 in 1965 and No. 1 in 1967 – which belied a 6-4 record.

    In Street & Smith’s College Football annual in 1969, the Nebraska preview began: "If the Huskers develop more offensive consistency to go with their always-tough defense (emphasis added), coach Bob Devaney should have no trouble posting his eighth straight winning record in 1969."

    Over time, the distribution of the black pullovers changed. They were no longer handed out before practice and collected afterward. During Tom Osborne’s Hall-of-Fame tenure as head coach, members of the top defensive units received Blackshirts at the end of pre-season practice, the week before the opening game. Typically before bowl games, McBride would award all senior defensive players the coveted practice jerseys at the bowl site, to wear during game preparations.

    The black jerseys themselves also changed, with players’ numbers and names added.

    Early on, the nickname was two words. That’s how it appeared for the first time in a Nebraska media guide. The 1965 edition refers to the "Black Shirt Battalion."

    During the 1970s, both forms – "Black Shirt" and "Blackshirt" – were used in media guides, sometimes in the same section, in at least one instance in the same paragraph.

    The 1978 media guide uses the form "Blackshirt," the same as "redshirt," and from that point on, "Blackshirt" appears to be the acceptable spelling, one word.

    In the early 2000s, the jerseys were hung in players’ lockers before the start of the week’s practice leading up to the opener. Then they were distributed in a pre-season ceremony, often with more than 11 defenders receiving them. "That’s not part of our philosophy," Coach Bo Pelini said.

    In his first season as coach, no Blackshirts were awarded until late in the season, after an outstanding defensive effort against Kansas. "Blackshirts are earned on the field," Pelini said.

    Even though only starters receive the jerseys, the term "Blackshirts" represents Nebraska’s defense in its entirety, its spirit and the considerable weight of five decades of success. In addition to leading the nation in total defense twice – in 1984 as well as in 1967 – the Blackshirts have ranked among the nation’s top 10 in all four major defensive categories five times (1967, 1984, 1994, 1996, 1999). They have also helped the Huskers win five national championships (1970, 1971, 1994, 1995, 1997).

    Say "Blackshirt" and the association is immediate: Nebraska defense.

    "I’m so proud it’s been maintained," the late Kelly would say many years after leaving Nebraska, many years after helping to establish the tradition.

    [​IMG]
    The skull and crossbones under the Husker helmet have become a symbol of the Blackshirt defense in recent years.
     
  20. djnnfl

    djnnfl Walk On

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    cool!
     
  21. Mr2Bits

    Mr2Bits 352

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    Nice work, guys. I enjoyed reading both of these.
     
  22. hawksupnya

    hawksupnya Walk On

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    Always thought the Blackshirts was pretty tuff. I think Iowa has answer for that bad ass attitude!



    [​IMG]

    http://thegazette.com/2010/06/21/quick-tour-of-the-pink-lockerroom/

    The Pink Locker Room at Iowa’s Kinnick Stadium

    By Tim Hyland, About.com Guide
    http://collegefootball.about.com/od/traditions/a/trad-iowapink.htm

    Iowa's Kinnick Stadium is home to a unique visitor's locker room—painted almost entirely in pink.

    The Pink Locker Room at Iowa’s Kinnick Stadium
    Teams that visit Iowa’s Kinnick Stadium don’t just have to deal with Kirk Feretnz’s Hawkeyes, or the usually insane Kinnick crowds, or late-season weather that can range from bad to miserable.
    They also have to deal with … the pink locker room.

    Yes, the visitor’s locker room at Kinnick is painted pink. The walls are pink. The floors are pink. The toilets are pink. It’s pink everywhere.

    The locker room is beloved and controversial. And at least according to one Iowa coaching legend, it is a big key to Iowa’s home-field success.

    Gridiron Psychology

    The pink locker room was the brainchild of legendary Iowa coach Hayden Fry.

    Fry was a psychology major at Baylor University, and once read that the color pink can have a calming effect on people.

    So after he arrived at Iowa, Fry ordered pink for Kinnick’s visiting locker room. Some say Fry actually believed the color would calm his team’s opponents. Others believe he just wanted to mess with their heads.

    As Fry wrote in his book, “A High Porch Picnic”: “When I talk to an opposing coach before a game and he mentions the pink walls, I know I've got him. I can't recall a coach who has stirred up a fuss about the color and then beat us."

    Bo Hates Pink

    Among the coaches who were annoyed by the pink locker room was Michigan’s Bo Schembechler.

    By most accounts, Schembechler absolutely hated the locker room, going so far as to have his staff bring along paper from Michigan to cover the walls when his team played there. His efforts didn’t always work, however: Under Schembechler, Michigan was just 2-2-1 at Kinnick.

    An Unexpected Controversy

    As part of a massive renovation of Kinnick Stadium in 2004, the pink locker room got even pinker, as pink lockers, toilets and showers were installed to go along with the pink walls.

    That didn’t sit well with some Iowa law professors and students, who in 2005 protested the locker room on the grounds that it reinforced stereotypes of women and homosexuals as weak. They charged that by having the pink locker room, Iowa was endorsing discrimination of those groups.

    The protests caused a stir for a while, but public opinion seemed strongly in favor of the tradition. As Washington Post columnist Sally Jenkins wrote that year: “I'm sure I should be more upset about the pink decor in the visitors' dressing room at Iowa. But as it happens, my violent knee-jerk reaction is that it's merely funny. If the armies of feminism want to change my thinking on that, they're going to have to slap electrodes to my pretty little forehead and zap me until I stop giggling.”

    The pink locker room remains pink today.

    Ive been in the locker room and it does grab your attention. Do I think it has any imact at all? No, it was a Hayden Fry gimmick thing that was pretty funny and something to talk about. Hayden was, is, and always will be recoginzed as the Coach that got Iowa football on the map. More on that later............................
     
  23. bustedukulele

    bustedukulele Walk On

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    Mike the Tiger
    His ride through Tiger Stadium before home games in a cage topped by the LSU cheerleaders is a school tradition. Before entering the stadium, his cage on wheels is parked next to the opponent’s locker room in the southeast end of the stadium. Opposing players must make their way past Mike’s cage to reach their locker room.


     
  24. BigSmooth33

    BigSmooth33 Walk On

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    What is a "Michigan Man"?

    With all of the recent talk in the media about having a "Michigan Man" replace Brady Hoke and its importance, I thought this would be a decent forum to try to define the term.

    It goes back to 1989, when Men's basketball coach Bill Frieder took a job at Arizona State before the NCAA Tournament. Bo Schembechler, was the AD, and was furious with the announcement before the tourney. Going against the rest of the administration and popular demand, Bo fired Frieder before the tournament and declared that a "Michigan man would coach Michigan."

    Steve Fisher was named the interim head coach, Michigan won the national championship, and the rest was history. The funny thing was about the "Michigan Man" statement, was that Fisher was no where near a "Michigan man." He had no prior connections to the university outside of Frieder, wasn't from Michigan, didn't go to Michigan... What I think Bo was more getting at, was that he wants people that want and love Michigan to lead Michigan. Steve Fisher became the first coined "Michigan Man" kind of.

    It's one of my favorite Bo Schembechler stories, and obviously is the same too for most other fans and alums, as it still resonates today. Unfortunately, the media and company forget the context of when "Michigan Man" came out and convolute the whole thing a bit much.

    One way or another, Brady Hoke is definitely a "Michigan Man" and I look forward to his tenure.
     
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  25. ChaoticUT

    ChaoticUT Life is Orange and White!

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    Thought I would take the time to represent a little Orange and White...

    The "T"
    The "T" appears in two places in Vol tradition. Coach Doug Dickey added the block letter T onto the side of the helmets in his first season in 1964. A rounded T came in 1968. Johnny Majors modified the stripe to a thicker stripe in 1977.
    The Volunteers also run through another "T." This T is formed by the Pride of the Southland marching bandwith its base at the entrance to the Tennessee locker room in the North endzone. The team makes a left turn inside the T and runs toward their bench on the east sideline. When Coach Dickey brought this tradition to Tennessee in 1965, the Vols locker room was underneath the East stands. The Vols would run through that T and turn back to return to their sideline. The locker room change was made in 1983. It was announced on January 24, 2010 that the Vols will switch their sideline from the east sideline to the west sideline for all home games. This will result in the Vols making a right out of the T instead of a left. This change will take effect for Tennessee's first home game of the 2010 season on September 4 against UT-Martin.

    [​IMG]
    Checkerboard end zones
    Tennessee first sported the famous checkerboard design in the mid sixties. They brought the design back in 1989. This tradition was also started by Dickey in 1964, and remained until artificial turf was installed at Neyland Stadium.
    The checkerboard was bordered in orange from 1989 until natural grass replaced the artificial turf in 1994. The return of natural grass brought with it the return of the green (or grass colored) border that exists today. The checkerboard end zones are painted by athletic department employees, John Payne, Kenton Page, Greg Coram, and William Barnett.
    [​IMG]
    Orange and White
    The Orange and White colors worn by the football team were selected by Charles Moore, a member of the very first football squad in 1891. They were from the American Daisy which grew on The Hill, the home of most of the classrooms at the university.
    The Orange is distinct to the school, and has been offered by The Home Depot for sale as a paint, licensed by the university. The home games at Neyland Stadium have been described as a "Sea of Orange" due to the large number of fans wearing the school color.

     
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