Stopping the Spread

Discussion in 'NCAA Football' started by Wick36, Jul 20, 2010.

  1. Wick36

    Wick36 Welcome to the Jungle

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    5,283
    Stopping the Spread

    I like to play a lot of Man or Zone with just the lineman rushing... but I don't get enough pressure and eventually someone gets open.

    The LB v WR matchups tend to get abused if I'm not running Cover 1 or something similar.

    If I bring a small blitz, they normally get blocked, and if I send a medium to large blitz, people always seem to be open right away.

    What do you do against people who use a lot of 4/5 WR sets.
     
  2. OregonGunner

    OregonGunner Walk On

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    175
    My advise (I consider myself a good defensive player, not the best) is patience. Mix up your coverages; man, cover 1, 2, and 3. I usually don't like blitzing because of the reasons you pointed out, however I have found that the occasional corner blitz works well when you are playing a QB that tends to have happy feet.

    Mixing it up and having patience is the key for me. I always err on the side of giving up the short passes to stop the big hitters. I like the 4 (instead of 3) man rush because, if the drive is long enough, usually you will get a sack eventually. And then I just try to make the drive take as many plays as possible, thinking that will increase my chances of getting a pivotal sack or turnover.....

    my 2 cents
     
  3. Archie Griffin

    Archie Griffin Walk On

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    5,738
    My formula looks like this:

    1: Spread the D-Linemen. Ends get to the QB much quicker, and if I'm going to get beat, I prefer the inside run to the out.

    2: Blitz off the edges - not the outside CB's, but the guys over the slots. They get home faster. Also, I like to attack the RB rather than the TE, so I call a blitz off one edge, and flip the play if I see a shorter route to the QB on the other side.

    3: Throw junk at it - I try to drop ends into coverage, zone blitz, and do anything the guy I'm playing may not be ready for. He's seen cover 1, 2, & 3 a million times. All you need is one floater over the middle to get a pick. Try to force a bad read.

    4: No easy reads. Shift the D. Show blitz and drop into zone. Set your audibles specifically for stopping the spread (no need for that 4-3 Under LB blitz to be in your book when your playing Oregon, for example. But five different dime package audibles - that can come in handy.

    5: And most important - look at the other guy's team. Does he have three WR's averaging 20 ypc? Is his HB his leading receiver? Chance are he'll do to you what he does to everyone else. If he bombs away, drop more guys deep. If he throws to the HB, keep your corners at home rather than back in cover 3.

    At least that's what I try to do.
     
  4. Wick36

    Wick36 Welcome to the Jungle

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    5,283
    Seems pretty solid.
     
  5. Wellar21

    Wellar21 Walk On

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    446
    Good advice, I just got beat by someone playing Texas going 4/5 WR no huddle all game. Allowed 54 points...and I thought I was good at defence lol. Just gotta mix up that play calling more.
     
  6. smlVICTORIES53

    smlVICTORIES53 Walk On

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2010
    Messages:
    3,245
    I find moving the D-line around and then slanting them helps. I'm just like everyone else who has already posted, bend but don't break is the key. Plus when I'm playing someone like that, I slow the game way down. I'll do 3 to 4 yards and a cloud of dust all game to milk the clock. Eventually you burn enough time to force your opponent to hurry and go on the fly even more than he'd like which leads to mistakes.
     
  7. johngalt11

    johngalt11 Walk On

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2010
    Messages:
    894
    I think that mixing it up is the way to go here. Like a few of the previous posters mention, the other players have seen a lot of the basic play calls, so by switching it up you can catch them off guard in effort to get a sack, turnover or incomplete pass.

    I also try to make sure that I have my corners covering receivers so that they can keep up speed wise. I tend to allow some passes in front of me while attempting to make sure no one gets behind my safety.

    Last but not least, I try and look at what I would do against myself to limit any weaknesses. If I see a hole in my defense and try to fix it before my opponent catches on.
     

Share This Page